A New Dawn, a New Dog

“Her name was Zola, she was a street girl . . . “   I can’t help warping Barry Manilow’s Grammy-winning ditty about a showgirl shimmying and shaking at the famous Copacabana nightclub when talking about Judy and Lee’s new pooch, but the melody just sticks in my head.

Mind if I stay? Zola on the welcome mat.

And this new girl just sticks in your heart, she is so sweet. She was found wandering the plaza, likely shown the door for having the audacity to birth a litter because, well, she had not been spayed (the local animal group eventually had her fixed and returned her to the streets). No one knows what became of her offspring, but the mother herself, a mere two or three years old, was, like so many abandoned animals, shocked and bewildered by her new homeless status. It’s hard to know how long she would have lasted on the mean streets, competing with other, more seasoned dogs for scraps and shelter. But Judy and Lee started feeding her just before Easter, then, one day she just followed Judy home, invited herself in, and has never left.

Safe and sound asleep in the garden.

Like many street dogs, she has issues, but they are mild and she will most certainly overcome. She’s quirky, seems to have a sense of humour, and even shows interest in play. Judy and Lee bought her a nice comfy bed to recline on in the sun, but she prefers to lie next to it, as opposed to on it. Maybe she doesn’t believe she’s worthy of such a cushy life. But then she’ll insist Lee taste-tests food before she’ll eat it, so who knows about her pedigree?

Which one’s the wild dog of Africa?

Even though she’s a Mexican mutt, she’s what you call a brindle. The term describes not a breed, but a coat colouring. You’ll see the tan/brown/black, sometimes tiger-like, streaking pattern on Greyhounds, bull dogs, Corgi’s, Great Danes, Dachshunds, but also, oddly, on cows, horses, guinea pigs, even lizards. The coats are also worn by the wild dogs of Africa. It’s not all that common, but there’s another stray dog who lives on the plaza who’s also a brindle, and Zola loves to run up and kiss his face. Brother? Father?

Without the burden of survival, Zola learns to be playful.

Judy and Lee were originally going to name her Zorra, the female equivalent to Zorro, that famous masked man in the TV western series of the 1950s (black markings on Zola’s face look like she’s wearing a mask). But a friend told them Zorra is a Mexican slang term for prostitute. A quick Google search, however, turns up only that Zorra is of Slavic origin (or Arabic, depending on the source) and means “dawn”.  That would have been pretty, but another search says the name Zola means either “earth” or “tranquil”, depending on the source.

Either way, Zola is as fresh as a new day; a tranquil, down-to-earth pooch who gives love freely, but not loosely. Even Tai would have liked her.

R.I.P., Talyn

“If the kindest souls were rewarded with the longest lives, dogs would outlive us all.” My sister’s golden retriever, Talyn, was a beautiful, big boy with an even bigger heart. Cancer slowly dragged him from us, but he will be remembered always as one of the kindest souls.

Last fall, after our last pet-sit, we were lucky enough to extend our time in Mexico and travel to the Yucatan Peninsula, then south to Belize and Guatemala where we explored 6 different Mayan ruins. Click the image below to see more amazing photos of these ancient ruins on Rick’s travel photo website, RixGlobalPix.com

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About Us

usplusclinkWe are a semi-retired married couple based in the Greater Vancouver area. We’re self-employed in the publishing industry and, with access to wi-fi, can work from anywhere. We fell into house- and pet-sitting by accident, when, in 2009, we helped out neighbours who were uncomfortable leaving their home alone. These neighbours wintered in Mexico each year, which got us to thinking, there must be others out there just like them. Turns out, there are. We discovered pet-sitting sites such as Housecarers, Trusted Housesitters, and HouseSitMexico, signed on and, dozens of sits later, we’ve been pet-sitting ever since. Read the References section to see what homeowners have said about us — every single one has asked us back, a testimonial in itself.

During our 35 years of marriage, we’ve traveled to roughly 60 countries on six continents, so we’re comfortable in just about any cultural setting. We’re all the things you’d expect (and demand) in people to whom you entrust your home and pets: reliable, dependable, honest, trustworthy, resourceful, conscientious, non-smoking, clean and tidy. We also love animals, and understand the special relationship you share with your pets. We tend to click immediately with dogs and cats and have bonded with many, even after short pet-sits. They are our top priority when they are in our care; you can rest assured they will be very well looked after in your absence.

Rick also loves to photograph the pets, and will send as many pictures as you like to reassure you they are happy and healthy while you enjoy your well-deserved time away. We are also very fit and active, so you know your dog will get all the activity s/he needs, and your kitty the playtime s/he deems appropriate (after all, dogs have owners, cats have staff!).

A Bit of Background…

The genesis of this site was unleashed in 2010 during our dog days in Mexico, when we cared for a menagerie of ex-pats’ pets in four different pueblos. Anyone who has ever met a dog or cat knows how inadvertently entertaining they can be. So I started chronicling their antics in a blog, which later bred into a book, Adventures in Pet-Sitting (available on Amazon and Smashwords). After our stint as critter sitters down south, we returned home to continue caring for cats and dogs in our native British Columbia. Like restless dogs, we don’t sit still for long, though. We hope to range far and wide and snuffle out animal houses in need of our services.

Pet-sitting is not all fun and games, however. Well, it mostly is, but occasionally a serious situation will arise. Like the time one of the dogs we cared for, a ferocious-looking beast who normally was very mild-mannered, suddenly snapped his leash and, fangs bared, charged after a smaller dog (disaster was averted; the only injuries incurred were paws and pride). Or the time a boa constrictor stalked a kitten in our care (again, disaster averted — narrowly). Or, when a dog or cat is so old that they come with a host of health issues, from feline AIDS to allergies that manifest in stinky scratch-athons to full-blown heart failure or cancer.

Since we care for the pets, we care for the conditions. Thus, we’ve learned a lot about AIDS, allergies, skin ailments, collapsing trachea, dysplasia, heart issues and cancer, and have experience caring for such pets in collaboration with a variety of veterinarians, both in BC and Mexico.

Thanks for stopping by. Perhaps we’ll care for your own four-legged baby!

Fur-ever yours,

Robin and Rick,

RobinandRick@yahoo.ca

Click here to find out how it all started with our first blogs – MexicoMomentos

R.I.P., Tai. November 2, 2016

Amid the hubbub of Mexico’s famed Day of the Dead, when families celebrate and remember their dearly departed with graveyard vigils, parties and parades, Tai quietly slipped away. Drained and depleted by cancerous tumours he’d been battling for about a year, his strong, sturdy body finally broke down and gave out. We were by his side, along with Judy and Lee, and as heartbreaking as it was to watch him wither, he was one lucky boy who lived one long, lucky life, and he knew it.

Judy and Lee had rescued Tai some 10 years ago when they found him abandoned on the beach. Scars across his face and neck led them to suspect he’d been kept as a fighting dog. They took him in, tamed him, pampered him, and loved him like a child. He repaid them with love, loyalty and devotion. He was our first pet-sit, and his fierce façade was intimidating, a kind of trial by fire. But over the years that we cared for him, we grew to love this special dog and his quirky ways. Not one for play or affection, when he did snuggle or plant a wet one on our face, it was an honour. We’ll miss you, amigo, but we’ll also celebrate and remember you. Always.

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Click on this image of Tai to see some photos of the times we spent together.

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Click on this image to read the”Mexico Momentos” blog recounting our first meeting with Tai in 2010. It remains one of the most popular posts Robin’s ever written.