A New Dawn, a New Dog

“Her name was Zola, she was a street girl . . . “   I can’t help warping Barry Manilow’s Grammy-winning ditty about a showgirl shimmying and shaking at the famous Copacabana nightclub when talking about Judy and Lee’s new pooch, but the melody just sticks in my head.

Mind if I stay? Zola on the welcome mat.

And this new girl just sticks in your heart, she is so sweet. She was found wandering the plaza, likely shown the door for having the audacity to birth a litter because, well, she had not been spayed (the local animal group eventually had her fixed and returned her to the streets). No one knows what became of her offspring, but the mother herself, a mere two or three years old, was, like so many abandoned animals, shocked and bewildered by her new homeless status. It’s hard to know how long she would have lasted on the mean streets, competing with other, more seasoned dogs for scraps and shelter. But Judy and Lee started feeding her just before Easter, then, one day she just followed Judy home, invited herself in, and has never left.

Safe and sound asleep in the garden.

Like many street dogs, she has issues, but they are mild and she will most certainly overcome. She’s quirky, seems to have a sense of humour, and even shows interest in play. Judy and Lee bought her a nice comfy bed to recline on in the sun, but she prefers to lie next to it, as opposed to on it. Maybe she doesn’t believe she’s worthy of such a cushy life. But then she’ll insist Lee taste-tests food before she’ll eat it, so who knows about her pedigree?

Which one’s the wild dog of Africa?

Even though she’s a Mexican mutt, she’s what you call a brindle. The term describes not a breed, but a coat colouring. You’ll see the tan/brown/black, sometimes tiger-like, streaking pattern on Greyhounds, bull dogs, Corgi’s, Great Danes, Dachshunds, but also, oddly, on cows, horses, guinea pigs, even lizards. The coats are also worn by the wild dogs of Africa. It’s not all that common, but there’s another stray dog who lives on the plaza who’s also a brindle, and Zola loves to run up and kiss his face. Brother? Father?

Without the burden of survival, Zola learns to be playful.

Judy and Lee were originally going to name her Zorra, the female equivalent to Zorro, that famous masked man in the TV western series of the 1950s (black markings on Zola’s face look like she’s wearing a mask). But a friend told them Zorra is a Mexican slang term for prostitute. A quick Google search, however, turns up only that Zorra is of Slavic origin (or Arabic, depending on the source) and means “dawn”.  That would have been pretty, but another search says the name Zola means either “earth” or “tranquil”, depending on the source.

Either way, Zola is as fresh as a new day; a tranquil, down-to-earth pooch who gives love freely, but not loosely. Even Tai would have liked her.

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